How Does a Split Air Conditioner Work?

The summer season is in full force, and your air conditioning is your best line of defense against the hottest days of the year. Whether you are finding yourself spending a considerable amount of air conditioning repair, or you simply feel that it is time to replace your air conditioning unit, you may want to consider a split air conditioner for your next installation. A company offering heating and cooling services and ac installation in Tampa can answer all of your questions about which type of unit will perform best in your household. To help you shop for your next ac unit, here is a look at how split air conditioners work. split - air - conditioner

Thermostat Detects Warm Air

When a split air conditioner is in operation, its thermostat will continually be detecting the current air temperature. If the thermostat reads an air temperature that is warmer than desired, the split air conditioner will automatically turn on. Typically, the thermostat in a split air conditioner is located on the inside of the unit.

Compressor Circulates Refrigerant

Once the thermostat has told the split air conditioner that it is time to start cooling the space, a component called a compressor will start circulating refrigerant. Refrigerant is a liquid substance that turns into gas as it cools. When refrigerant is sent through the coils inside the unit, it will naturally start to cool down the surrounding air. Low refrigerant in a system can lead to an overall loss of performance and efficiency.

Evaporator Fan Collects Air

As the refrigerant is being circulated through the system, a component called an evaporator will start collecting warm air from the room. The warm air will be sent through a chilling chamber once it has been captured by the fan. After being chilled, the air will be recalculated into the indoor space, resulting in lower overall temperatures. The compact nature of the evaporator and compressor systems allow the split air conditioner to be an efficient addition to any HVAC system.