• How to Reduce Indoor Pollution

    When you think of air pollution, you’re probably thinking about factories and cars, sending dangerous emissions up into the ozone layer. You may not immediately consider indoor air pollution, but if you think about it, it’s definitely a threat to your well-being. The contaminants inside our homes and offices put us at risk for allergic reactions and illnesses that include stroke, heart disease, COPD, and lung cancer. Fortunately, you can improve your indoor air quality by following a few simple guidelines.

    • Know the culprits. What are the causes of indoor air pollution? In developing countries, dangerous indoor air quality is the result of people cooking indoors, using inefficient stoves with fuel like kerosene, biomass, or coal. In the United States, though, the sources are more likely to be things like fragrances, cleaners, smoking, or pets. Taking a critical look at your home and work environments in order to determine what could potentially cause problems is the first step toward cleaner air.
    • Keep your smoke outside. Smoking cigarettes causes a wealth of health problems, both for the smoker and for those who breathe in the second-hand The best thing you can do for your health and your environment is to quit, but if you must smoke, do it outside. Other sources of smoke should be used with caution, too. Don’t overdo it with candles, and if you use a wood-burning stove, make sure it’s installed properly and well-ventilated.

    • Maintain proper ventilation and moisture levels. You can often improve air quality the old-fashioned way, just by opening a window. When you cook, use the fan above the stove, and when you shower, use the fan in the bathroom to reduce moisture in the air. You might also consider a dehumidifier or an air purifier with high-efficiency particulate arresting (HEPA) air filters.
    • Cut down on chemicals. Every day, we use all kinds of chemicals without giving them much thought. From air fresheners and candles to household cleaners to personal care products, to paint and solvents, there are a host of pollutants in your home that you probably don’t even realize are a problem. Many of these products contain phthalates, which are used to make the fragrances bond to the product in which they’re being used. Unfortunately, phthalates have been shown to disrupt the endocrine system. Does this mean that all fragrances are bad? No, but if you really love giving your house an extra boost of scent, you’re better off sticking to essential oils or simmering some spices on your stove.
    • Clean the house. How will you clean the house, while eliminating chemicals and fragrances? It’s easier than you might think. Look for all-natural, non-toxic cleaners, or make your own cleaners, using ingredients like borax, vinegar, and baking soda. Ditch the carpet, if possible, and clean your floors with a steam mop: steaming your floors requires only water. Dust frequently, and keep clutter to a minimum. Wash your bedding and any washable stuffed animals regularly, cleaning these items once a week in hot water, and vacuum your upholstered furniture when you clean your floors. Skip curtains and drapes, opting for window treatments that can be wiped clean.
    • Keep contaminants out. Make a rule in your home that people remove their shoes at the door. If you’re not comfortable doing this, at least have a sturdy doormat that can scrape most of the contaminants off before they’re tracked into your house. If you have pets, keep them well-groomed, and vacuum frequently to reduce pet dander in the house.
    • Be smart about safety. Have your home tested for radon, a colorless, odorless gas that can significantly raise the risk of lung cancer. Many items give off radon, including granite countertops, so it’s important to know that your home is safe. Radon is not the only dangerous chemical that may be in the air, though, so install a carbon monoxide detector, and keep your household appliances in good repair, so that they don’t leak any fumes into your atmosphere.
    • Bring in some greenery. Plants are great for improving indoor air quality, and studies have shown that they even reduce levels of formaldehyde in the home. The roots and the foliage work together to absorb chemicals released from synthetic materials in your home, while the plants themselves give off oxygen, improving our air quality.
    • Maintain your HVAC system. Change your filters regularly, and call in a professional when the seasons change, to give your system the maintenance it needs to keep it running efficiently.

    If you need to find a professional to check your HVAC, or you’re in the market for air duct cleaning, repair, and replacement services in Tampa, St. Petersburg and the surrounding area, please feel free to call Air Rescue at (813) 375-9982. Since 1946, our family-owned business has been providing superior service at unbeatable prices, offering heat and air conditioning repair services, new HVAC system installations, and more for homes and businesses. The service team at Air Rescue Air Conditioning consists of 75 expertly trained and licensed technicians, who work quickly and efficiently. Our service and pricing guarantee ensures that we always arrive on time, offer you the lowest price in the industry, and leave you 100% satisfied. Schedule your service visit today, and we’re confident that you’ll make us our HVAC company for life.